With a Local – Whitehorse, the Yukon, Canada

Whitehorse is the territorial capital of the Yukon, Canada. To gain a local’s perspective of what the city offers visitors I chatted with Teena Dickson.

Teena is the owner of Who What Where Tours. The company was presented with the Small Business of the Year Award at the 2019 Yukon Tourism Awards of Excellence.

Now home to around 30,000 people, Whitehorse was established during the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 1890s. Nicknamed ‘the wilderness city’, Whitehorse is a gateway to exploring the likes of Dawson City and Kluane National Park and Reserve.

The MacBride Museum (1124 Front Street) provides insights into the territory’s history. Prefer natural history and anthropology? Pop into the Yukon Beringia Interpretative Centre, close to the city’s airport. The attraction is named after the land bridge that once connected the region with the landmass today known as Siberia.

The Yukon Beringia Interpretative Centre near Whitehorse's airport.
The Yukon Beringia Interpretative Centre near Whitehorse’s airport.

Why should people visit Whitehorse?

Visitors should come here to because we have the cleanest air, the best water and we are a big natural playground. We sell wilderness and it’s very easy to have that experience.

Mountains, forest and a lake in Kluane National Park and Reserve.
Mountains, forest and a lake in Kluane National Park and Reserve.

What is your personal favourite place?

I have several places. You could easily go off the beaten path an hour. I would say the Kusawa River Valley area has lots of great hiking, paddling, easy camping and no people.

Teena Dickson, the owner of Who What Where Tours, in Kluane National Park
Teena Dickson, the owner of Who What Where Tours.

Where would you take a visitor for a meal in Whitehorse?

I would take them to the Miner’s Daughter (103 Main Street) because it has such a sexy name and it is owned by a gold miner’s daughter. It’s in a historic building where many gold miners used to hang out.

They have great food and it has a great atmosphere. People come there to have fun and enjoy local fish and local vegetables. The meats are done very rustic, in terms of that good old steak or ribs that we’re known for.

Statue of a Gold Miner on Main Street in Whitehorse.
Statue of a Gold Miner on Main Street in Whitehorse.

Where do you recommend for a drink?

I would take guests to the Woodcutter’s Blanket (112 Strickland); what another great name! It used to be an old taxidermy cabin. It has two moose on top.

They have amazing cocktails and good Yukon brews. It’s turned into a bit of a brewhouse. It’s has atmosphere and characters walking by. You can’t just have one cocktail there!

Flight of beers served in the tap room of the Winterlong Brewing Co. of Whitehorse.
A flight of beers served in the tap room of the Winterlong Brewing Co., which is also based in Whitehorse.

What’is your favourite quirky piece of Whitehorse history?

The Dirty Northern Bastard, right next to the restaurant I was just talking about, is a great pub. It’s a local house and used to be a hotel for miners.

A long time ago they found a mummified cat in there. It’s now in a glass case and is considered the oldest pussy in the north!

Mountains in Kluane National Park seen from the Alaska Highway, which runs through the Yukon.
Mountains in Kluane National Park seen from the Alaska Highway, which runs through the Yukon.

What do you recommend near Whitehorse if people have a day to spare?

I would definitely send them to the Carcross area, which is 45 minutes’ drive south of Whitehorse. It has mountain vistas, pristine southern lakes and it has the world’s smallest desert. It has a [First Nations’] cultural learning centre and a touch of the gold rush.

Facade of a shop decorated with First Nations' artwork in Carcross.
Facade of a shop decorated with First Nations’ artwork in Carcross.

Getting to Whitehorse

Air Canada and Air North operate flights to Erik Nielsen Whitehorse International Airport (YXY).

Whitehorse railway station was historically on the White Pass and Yukon Route.
How about the train? Whitehorse railway station was historically on the White Pass and Yukon Route.

Further information

See the Travel Yukon and the Destination Canada websites for information about things to do and see in the Yukon.

Photos illustrating this post are by Why Eye Photography. Why Eye Photography is based in North East England. To discuss photography projects contact 07947 587136.

If you enjoyed this post why not sign up for the free Go Eat Do newsletter? It’s a hassle-free way of getting links to posts on a monthly basis.

‘Like’ the Go Eat Do Facebook page to see more photos and content.

Pinterest pin for local tips on where to go and what to see in and around Whitehorse in the Yukon, Canada.
Use Pinterest? Pin this for later for local tips on where to go and what to see in and around Whitehorse in the Yukon, Canada. The building shown is the MacBride Museum.

6 Comments

  • Alison

    August 29, 2019 at 07:08 Reply

    What a brilliant name for the town and the pub! It looks lovely, unspoilt wilderness

    • Stuart Forster

      August 30, 2019 at 15:08 Reply

      It’s a fun place to hang out. I thoroughly enjoyed being there.

  • Janis

    August 31, 2019 at 08:43 Reply

    Such an interesting looking place, incredible scenery and those pubs sound very intriguing.

    • Stuart Forster

      September 3, 2019 at 07:58 Reply

      I tried a handful of places and think that Whitehorse makes for a good night out.

  • Nell (Pigeon Pair and Me)

    September 5, 2019 at 13:23 Reply

    “The oldest pussy in the north” – ooh la la! I like this woman 🙂

    • Stuart Forster

      September 5, 2019 at 16:50 Reply

      Teena was fund to travel with and proved an insightful guide.

Post a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.