Aberdeen Art Gallery

Aberdeen Art Gallery reopened on 2 November 2019. It’s undergone a major redevelopment over the past four years. The new look gallery now has a third level and is connected to the renovated Remembrance Hall plus the adjacent Cowdray Hall.

Disclosure: Stuart Forster, the author of this post, visited Aberdeen Art Gallery during a press trip organised by VisitAberdeenshire, which did not review of approve this article.

View into Aberdeen Art Gallery's Sculpture Court from the first floor of the redeveloped building.
View into Aberdeen Art Gallery’s Sculpture Court from the first floor of the redeveloped building.

Stepping into revamped Victorian building made a positive first impression. From the entrance I peered into the atrium-like Sculpture Court, which has a black and white marble floor. Artworks are ranged between the Sculpture Court’s granite pillars. Tracey Emin’s neon love poem, For You, is displayed between muscular males in a room that also houses Dame Barbara Hepworth’s Requiem.

The oval skylight above the Sculpture Court is a feature of the redevelopment designed by Hoskins Architects.
The oval skylight above the Sculpture Court is a feature of the redevelopment designed by Hoskins Architects.

An oval skylight enables natural light to flood into the neoclassical building, which was designed by Alexander Marshall McKenzie and first opened in 1885. The story of Aberdeen Art Gallery’s evolution is summarised in Collecting Art, the first of 18 themed galleries displaying items from the city’s expansive permanent collection of fine and decorative arts across the lower two floors.

A view of the Sculpture Court at Aberdeen Art Gallery.
A view of the Sculpture Court at Aberdeen Art Gallery.

The new third floor

The new third level hosts the three BP Galleries for special exhibitions. The first artist to have his work shown in them is the photographer Martin Parr. His newly commissioned portrait series, Aberdeen At Leisure, and Think of Scotland will be displayed until 23 February 2020.

The upper storey also houses a café and a small gallery that celebrates work by local artists. A seminar room is wedged between two terraces giving views over central Aberdeen.

Aberdeen Art Gallery's second-floor cafe stands next to the Express Yourself gallery, celebrating local artists, and looks out onto the West Terrace.
Aberdeen Art Gallery’s second-floor cafe stands next to the Express Yourself gallery, celebrating local artists, and looks out onto the West Terrace.

Aberdeen Art Gallery

Aberdeen Art Gallery is free to visit. The works displayed include pieces by internationally renowned artists such as Claude Monet, Henry Moore and Gavin Turk plus works that highlight local stories. The Balmoral Phenomenon gallery explores royal connections with the Scottish Highlands and, of course, Balmoral Castle, which is an 80-minute drive from Aberdeen.

The Art of Empowerment gallery tells a story of women in art at the turn of the last century, providing insights into the Suffragette movement in northeastern Scotland. It’s preceded by the James McBey – Artist Adventurer gallery, which presents the work of the Aberdeenshire-born painter, draftsman and etcher.

The James McBey - Artist Adventurer gallery provides insights into the life and work of the Aberdeenshire-born creator.
The James McBey – Artist Adventurer gallery provides insights into the life and work of the Aberdeenshire-born creator.

With interactive displays and lucid captioning, the gallery is easy and enjoyable to explore. You don’t necessarily need to be an art aficionado to appreciate the artworks displayed.

Paintings and dresses displayed within the Art of Empowerment gallery at Aberdeen Art Gallery
Paintings and dresses displayed within the Art of Empowerment gallery.

The Cowdray and Remembrance Halls

The Cowdray Hall, a recital venue, is named in honour of its patron Lady Cowdray, who wanted to encourage Aberdonians’ taste for art and music. The hall has been restored to its original colour scheme of 1925. It has a pipe organ plus a stage with a grand piano and will open its doors on Thursdays for a series of Lunchbreak Concerts. The events are free with donations encouraged.

The Remembrance Hall was designed as a place for contemplation and reflection in the wake of World War One. Members of Britain’s armed forces and the Royal British Legion were consulted regarding how to make the space relevant today.

Poppies are projected onto the floor while the names of all Aberdeen’s fallen are displayed digitally on the wall. Forget Them Not, a new commission created by Gordon Burnett, stands within the hall.

The Remembrance Hall is accessible via the Aberdeen Art Gallery.
The Remembrance Hall is accessible via the Aberdeen Art Gallery.

Getting to Aberdeen

Like to idea of travelling to Aberdeen to visit Aberdeen Art Gallery?

I flew from Newcastle to Aberdeen with Loganair. The flight had a duration of 50 minutes. I chose a seat on the left-hand side of the aircraft and enjoyed spectacular views of Scotland’s east coast in the low morning sunshine.

Flybe is another airline operating flights between the two cities.

Coming from further afield? Aberdeen International Airport (ABZ) is served by the likes of British Airways, KLM, SAS and easyJet.

The 727 bus runs between the airport and central Aberdeen. The journey to the Union Square Bus Station takes just over half-an-hour.

The rail connection between Newcastle and Aberdeen takes upwards of four hours. From London, the train journey takes about seven hours 35 minutes.

Aberdeen is known as the Granite City because of the stone used in the construction of many of its buildings.
Aberdeen is known as the Granite City because of the stone used in the construction of many of its buildings.

Staying in Aberdeen

I stayed at the Sandman Signature Aberdeen Hotel (St Andrew Street, Aberdeen; Tel. 01224 945555), which is suited to the needs of both business and leisure travellers. The hotel is less than five minutes’ walk from Aberdeen Art Gallery and well placed for exploring some of the Granite City’s pubs and bars on a night out.

My sizeable room had a fridge, a microwave and a kettle, plus a desk for cracking on with work. The bathtub was snug but fine for a brief but relaxing pre-sleep dip. The bathroom also had a separate walk-in shower.

The building that the 218-room hotel occupies was formerly used as Robert Gordon University’s St Andrew Street campus. A buffet breakfast was laid out in the Chop Grill and Bar on the ground floor.

Contemporary artworks in the Human Presence gallery on the ground floor of Aberdeen Art Gallery.
Contemporary artworks in the Human Presence gallery on the ground floor of Aberdeen Art Gallery.

Insider tip for art lovers

If you enjoy art, you may well enjoy visiting The Fife Arms in nearby Braemar, another of the buildings designed by Alexander Marshall McKenzie. Now a luxury hotel, it features original artwork by the likes of Pablo Picasso and Pieter Brueghel the Younger on its walls.

For works by Flemish Masters you don’t need to dash straight there. Brueghel’s The Faithless Shepherd is displayed on Aberdeen Art Gallery’s first floor, in the Exploring Art gallery.

French and Scottish artworks from the 19th century are paired within the French Impressions gallery on the first-floor of Aberdeen Art Gallery.
French and Scottish artworks from the 19th century are paired within the French Impressions gallery on the first-floor of Aberdeen Art Gallery.

Did you know?

The total cost of the redevelopment of Aberdeen Art Gallery came to £36.4 million.

The art gallery hosts a programme of free 10-minute talks providing informal insights into displays.

The Paradise Lost gallery explores the impact of warfare on art and artists with connections to Aberdeen.
The Paradise Lost gallery explores the impact of warfare on art and artists with connections to Aberdeen.

Further information

Visit the Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museums website for information on the free-to-visit attractions opening times plus its programme of events and exhibitions. The ground floor of the art gallery has a café and shop.

See the VisitAberdeenshire website for ideas about things to do and places to visit in and around the Granite City. If you’re thinking about a trip encompassing more of Scotland then check out the VisitScotland site.

See With A Local — Aberdeen, Scotland for insights into the favourite places to eat and drink of one of the city’s resident food bloggers.

Photos illustrating this post are by Why Eye Photography, which is based in northeast England and contactable by calling 07947 587136.

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Use Pinterest? Pin this and return to read about Aberdeen Art Gallery, which reopened on 2 November 2019 following a £34.6 million redevelopment project.
Use Pinterest? Pin this and return to read about Aberdeen Art Gallery, which reopened on 2 November 2019 following a £34.6 million redevelopment project.

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